There's Bubbles on My Hand!

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Toddler

This month, in the toddler room, we have observed as the children become more and more engaged within the classroom. We have been amazed with how well they have adapted. As they began to extend their play, we have observed great sensory play; exploring through curiosity and creative minds.

One of these sensory experiences has been water play. When the children are asked to wash their hands before lunch, snack, after going to the bathroom or going outside, they seem to spend an extended period running their hands through the water, turning on and off the taps or splashing it onto the sink top to play with further. We have been opening up our water play tables almost everyday, as they seem to be curious and fascinated with the stimulation it brings.

2 toddlers playing in the bubbles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One morning, Lilya was in the bathroom. She was in there for 5 minutes beside the educator who was changing diapers. I asked her if she wanted to play with the water at the table. She exclaimed “yes” along with her other friends in the classroom. I grabbed a smaller bucket and placed it under the sink. Hudson, Theo, Oliver, Ivy and Lilya all watched as the water filled. I added soap to the bucket and asked the children what they thought would happen when I added. Oliver looked at me, a bit confused, so I told them “let’s test it out.” Once the bubbles started to form Theo yelled, “bubbles.” After the bucket was filled, we brought it to the table where all the children submerged their hands in the water and swished them around in a circular motion. Bela dipped her hands into the bubbles then looked at her hands in shock. The children followed along. I asked, “how do they feel” and suggested the word soft. Oliver then looked at me and said “sticky” as he pulled his hands filled with soap apart. Meanwhile, Lilya began to blow her bubbles back into the bucket.

Toddler girl scooping water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This type of play is referred to as exploratory play; the use of all senses during play. Sensory play is so critical during these years as it is a way of learning about the world around us. We are going to continue to bring new and inviting sensory activities into the classroom that will expand our understandings.

toddler girl showing off the bubbles on her hand